All lectures are free, but reservations are required.

Understanding Slavery in New Netherland and Colonial New York

Dr. Dennis J. Maika, New Netherland Institute
Thursday, November 6, 2014
5:00–6:30 pm

New York's history of slavery began in the early days of seventeenth-century New Netherland and ended officially in the decades after the American Revolution. Dr. Maika will present on the experience of the enslaved people and their enslavers during the colonial period, with a focus on New Netherland.

Funding for this lecture comes from The New Netherland Institute, The Netherlands Consulate General in New York, and The Netherland-American Foundation.

Pluralism and the Problem of Religious Toleration in 17th Century New Netherland and New York

Dr. Noah L. Gelfand, University of Connecticut at Stamford
Thursday, November 13, 2014
5:00–6:30 pm

New Netherland has long been remembered as a colony inhabited by settlers with different religious orientations, yet for many colonists, the ability to live and worship according to their conscience was a struggle. Dr. Gelfand will explore religious pluralism and the meaning of toleration during this era.

Funding for this lecture comes from The New Netherland Institute, The Netherlands Consulate General in New York, and The Netherland-American Foundation.

Anti-Slavery Activism in 19th Century New York and Brooklyn

Dr. Prithi Kanakamedala, Bronx Community College-CUNY
Thursday, February 26, 2015
5:00–6:30 pm

Brooklyn and New York's anti-slavery activists shaped the politics in their neighborhoods as well as the national abolitionist movement. Dr. Kanakamedala will examine the revolutionary vision of 19th century abolitionists, and the activism and self-determination of free black communities in Brooklyn and New York.

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Music and Activism: New York's Folk Music Revival of the 1950s and 60s

Dr. Stephen Petrus
Thursday, March 26, 2015
5:00–6:30 pm

Greenwich Village’s folk music revival of the 1950s and 1960s was inextricably linked to the civil rights, anti-war, and antinuclear movements. Dr. Petrus will examine the connection between folk music and activism, and the strategies used to advance the causes of the southern freedom struggle and pacifism.

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New York's Earth Day 1970, and the Birth of the Environmental Movement

Dr. Sarah Seidman, Curator of Social Activism, Museum of the City of New York
Thursday, April 16, 2015
5:00–6:30 pm

On April 22, 1970 more than 100,000 New Yorkers - men, women, and schoolchildren - took part in the world’s first Earth Day. Dr. Seidman will explore how this event created a new generation of activists, whose stories and approaches are instructive in considering the local and global environmental challenges of today.

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AIDS Activism as American History

Dr, Claire Potter, The New School
Thursday, May 14, 2015
5:00–6:30 pm

The AIDS Coalition To Unleash Power (ACT UP), created in March 1987, drew on existing forms of activism and pioneered creative new ways to influence the political and medical system. Using publicly available oral histories, Dr. Claire Potter will examine the role that New York City activists played in the national response to the AIDS epidemic.

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